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How To Apply To College And Deal With Stress

 
Don't forget to keep breathing. This is not the end. In fact, this is a new beginning. When applying to college, it can be hard to remember that the prospect to continue your training is actually a good thing. This views, exciting as it is, will inevitably be a source of stress. It is both stressful and unrealistic to try to look at the big picture of your future at one time. It is much easier to focus on the small steps you can take to prepare, one at a time. As you complete these steps, will stress gradually give way to the excitement and relief to know that you have made good decisions about your future and carefully prepared for you.

Research
1. Write the names down on all schools you are considering. Decide on an ideal number of schools for applications taking into account the cost of fees, and how much time you should spend on the applications.

2. Make a list of the criteria that are most important to you in choosing a school.

3. For each of the schools you are considering, collect information about the criteria that you specify. You can find this information on localcollegeexplorer or by asking the school to send you information.

4. Use of the information you have collected, you must place the schools you are considering in order of priority.

5. Limit the time you spend researching. The amount of information about colleges that are available are almost limitless. While researching phase can be fun, it can be a means of procrastination for those who fear to start the actual application process.

Organize
6. When you've narrowed your choices to your priority schools, make a master list of all deadlines related to each of the schools. If you keep a planner or calendar, mark these dates there too.

7. Start keeping a large folder or Binder to include all important information that you collect about colleges and application material. Designate a special section in the directory for personal information and documents such as test scores and students ' records. Keep everything in one place.

8. Make a list of the steps you must take to complete each of your programs. Set your own limits for completing these steps, separated from the master list of deadlines. Keep in mind that many colleges have their deadlines set at the same time.

9. Look at the essay requirements for each school. Many essay topics for college applications is very general or liberal. If it is possible, adapt the essays you have already implemented a program to fit another.

Take It Slow
10. Tag on one task at a time. Set realistic goals each day, as you know you can accomplish.

11. Take a break when you are finished with each of the tasks you set for yourself. Go for a walk. Doing something you enjoy.

12. When you are finished with the goals you have set for the day, tell you that you are done with thinking on college applications at the moment. Let your mind to deal with anything else.
 


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